Knit and Natter

As the days get shorter and the weather gets cooler let’s get together, knit and natter for our mental health and to help others.

By signing up to our Knit and Natter you’re not just helping YOUR mental health – you’ll be making a difference to the lives of thousands of children who simply can’t explain how they’re feeling.

Knit and Natter

As the days get shorter and the weather gets cooler let’s get together, knit and natter for our mental health and to help others.

By signing up to our Knit and Natter you’re not just helping YOUR mental health – you’ll be making a difference to the lives of thousands of children who simply can’t explain how they’re feeling.

mum and daughter cropped

Did you know that knitting and other crafts are proven to help your mental health? The rhythmic motion and focus of crafts like knitting, crochet and cross-stitch to name just a few can distract from the symptoms of anxiety, stress and depression and even reduce the physical symptoms like high blood pressure and a fast heart rate. The repetitive movements have even been found to have the same benefits to your mind and body as a meditation session!

This Autumn and Winter we’re asking you to take some time out from your daily routine and stress, gather some friends and get stitching to not only help your own mental health but to help fund our vital research that’s working towards improving mental health for children with brain conditions.

How to host a knit and natter

  1. Sign up and get your pack
    Our Knit and Natter Pack has lots of tool to help you make your event a success.
  2. Plan your event
    Read our tips for hosting a Knit and Natter.
  3. Invite your guests
    Check out our resources page for posters and social graphics.
  4. Knit and Natter
    Get together and craft for better mental health for everyone.
  5. Pay in your donations
    You’ve knitted, you’ve nattered and you’ve raised vital funds. You’re a Cerebra Superhero!

Why?

Mental health is very important to us here at Cerebra as anxiety and low mood is a widespread problem for children with genetic syndromes and intellectual disability – more common than it is for the general population.

The problem

However, most diagnostic tests for anxiety involve people being able to communicate how they are feeling to doctors and other professionals. For children with these disabilities, it’s incredibly difficult for them to firstly identify that what they’re feeling is anxiety and, as many are minimally verbal, to communicate this to someone else.

If we can’t accurately identify that a child is feeling anxious then we can’t put in place measures to help them so many children are continuing to struggle with unrecognised, debilitating feelings of anxiety.

Our solution

Our research at the Cerebra Network of Neurodevelopmental Disorders is tackling this problem head on. Dr Hayley Crawford and Dr Jane Waite are leading a ground-breaking study of children with genetic syndromes and intellectual disability to understand what anxiety looks like in these children and to therefore improve assessments for anxiety.

They will also use experimental techniques to identify and understand the risk factors and characteristics that place a child at higher risk for experiencing mental health problems.

This research will help the team to develop and pilot an intervention that will improve the negative impact of mental health problems for children with genetic conditions and intellectual disability.

Plan your event

Get all of our tops tips for planning your event and making it a success.

Fundraising materials

Download our resources to help you spread the word about your event and raise more money on the day.